AUGUST 3, 2022 (28-MINUTE READ)

Brian Hanks:

The buyer advocate, we help the buyer through the process of transitions. For most folks, the practice that they purchase is going to be the single largest purchase decision of your life, probably. And it would behoove anyone to approach that purchase carefully, and that's what we help with.

Corey Brown:

I'm Corey Brown, and this is, Provide's the Path to Owning It Podcast, where I sit down with trusted industry experts in Provide's network to give you the tools and advice you need to take your practice ownership dreams into your own hands. From owning your own practice, to expanding or improving an existing practice, we'll help pave the way for you to achieve your dental or veterinary career dreams, and guide you through all the nuances of the practice ownership journey.

Corey Brown:

Please make sure to follow us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever else you listen. On this week's show. We're going to be discussing the importance of working with a buyer representative. We are joined by Brian Hanks, owner of Dentalbuyeradvocates.com. Brian has an MBA in accounting from the University of Michigan, an undergraduate degree from Brigham Young University. He currently lives in Salt Lake City, Utah, with his spouse and four kids, and his company, Dental Buyer Advocates has been helping dentists buy practices for over five years. Brian, thanks for joining us today. We're really happy to have you.

Brian Hanks:

Thank you for having me. I'm honored.

Corey Brown:

Let's start with just a little introduction, a little more from you, for listeners who might not know. Can you tell us about what Dentalbuyeradvocates.com is, who it benefits, and what it helps solve for providers?

Brian Hanks:

It's easy to do with three words: dentists, buyers, and nationwide. I'll give you more than three words, Corey, but that's the summary. You think about what a broker does for the seller of a dental practice. They help them come up with a value, they help them through the process. They help them get in touch with key partners. We do the same thing, just for the buyer, and I got into doing this so we can get into background and stuff, but it's not been traditionally a place where there's been a lot of help. So, our company really focuses on the niche of just helping the buyers through the process of transitions.

Brian Hanks:

Lots of folks call us a, "Buyer advocate," is a phrase that's used. "Buyer's accountant," is sometimes used, "Buyer's broker," "Buyer's agent." Some of those phrases are commonly thrown around, but yeah, in short, we help the buyer through everything they need to do through the process of buying a practice, short of getting a loan, which is you guys, and then the legal side, which is, of course, a lawyer. We don't play lawyer, but we know some good ones. So, that's what we do.

Corey Brown:

Why do you think that hasn't been such a commonplace thing in the market in the past, and is there an emergence of buyer representation that's happening now?

Brian Hanks:

That's a very, very simple explanation. Sellers have lots of money. Buyers have lots of student loans. So, traditionally, buyers haven't had a lot of money, and they've been at the mercy of other folks in the transition process that are there to, quote unquote, give them advice, or in some cases take full advantage of them. So, we've put together a business model where, for a very reasonable fee, buyers can get the help and the advocacy that they deserve through the process. Someone watching their backs, someone who has their best interests at heart.

Corey Brown:

Absolutely. So, if I'm a provider and I have these dreams of owning my own practice, why would you tell me to consider using a buyer representative? What are some of those big advantages?

Brian Hanks:

The thing that we ultimately sell, Corey, is confidence, okay. So, when you are about to make the biggest purchase decision of your life, probably, it's possible maybe you buy a house that costs more than your practice these days, but it's unlikely. For most folks, the practice that they purchase is going to be the single largest payment of any kind they're going to make for a single thing ever, and that's a big deal. It would behoove anyone to be approach that purchase carefully, and that's what we help with. At a very basic level, we help with three questions. "Is this a good practice to buy, yes or no?" "If it is, what's a fair price to pay, and how does that compare to the asking price?" Then, the third question is the big one for all buyers, is, "Okay, how much money am I going to make if I buy this practice?" At a fundamental level, we help answer all three of those questions, plus the rest of the process and how to navigate the rest of the purchase process.

Corey Brown:

Yeah. I've had a background in residential real estate for over 11 years, and having buyer representation there is pretty commonplace. I personally can't imagine how not having anyone to help with inspections, appraisals, in this case, due diligence, patient demographics, that sort of thing, I would think just would be a disaster for most of those providers. So, what are some of those risks? Somebody buying a practice without representation?

Brian Hanks:

The risks without representation are that you don't understand what you're buying, you don't understand where the pitfalls might be, you can't see where the bodies are hidden in the financial statements, some of those things. You referenced the residential real estate market. More people are familiar with that, and it is very common to have buyer's broker, buyer's agent, seller's agent, and they typically split the fee and it's 6%, and sometimes there's haggling, but it's usually three and three, right?

Brian Hanks:

The dental transitions industry, for the last 40 50 years, was all on the seller's side, the representation on the seller's side, and the traditional fee was 10% of the purchase price to the seller's broker. The buyer, buyers didn't have agents, right, but if you think about the dental market 30, 40, 50 years ago, it made a little more sense than it does today for that to be the case, right?

Brian Hanks:

This is a little unfair to the retiring dentists out there, but 30, 40, 50 years ago, a dental practice was a dental practice, was a dental practice. They were more interchangeable than they are today, and so, you asked me what the risks are of someone not having help, well, 40 years ago, Dr. Singh's practice down the street was very similar to Dr. Smith's, very similar to Dr. Cohen. It was a dental office. Size was a little different, number of chairs. There were a few variables and factors, geography and all that, but these days dental practices are starting to niche, right? They're starting to develop their own specialties and patients, and we do cosmetics, and we're all about sleep dentistry, and we're the implant specialist, we can do all on fours all day long, right?

Brian Hanks:

So, buyers understand at a fundamental level, what they're buying, but there are all kinds of information coming at that buyer, and it's coming fast and it's coming furious, and no-one has ever taught them this process before, right? What's a profit and loss statement? What's a tax return? "That number at the bottom of the tax return looks really low. Is that how much money I'm going to get?" There is no-one helping them through this process, and that's what we do.

Brian Hanks:

So, the risks are that you just take everyone else's word for what amounts to the largest purchase decision of your life. So, Corey, I would say the bigger risk isn't that you maybe overpay for a practice, although that is a risk, right? Somebody overcharges you for a practice. Buying a dental practice, it's buying a job, it's buying a career, it's buying your location for the next 20, 30, 40 years, right? So the risk is, you get into the wrong practice.

Brian Hanks:

I like to caution, I'll be out speaking to residency programs or dental schools and things, and I say, "Okay, you guys have been on the dental treadmill. You know the dental treadmill, right? It's biology undergrad, take the DAT, get into dental schools, pick a school, go into tons of student loans, but survive four years, maybe do a GPR, AEGD, come out, associate for a couple years. Then, you get to this point where you're like, "Okay, I'm sick of the associate treadmill. I'm ready to have control over the types of patients I see the, types of procedures, the ethics of the dentistry that I do, who I work with, with my assistants and hygienist, I'm ready for some control, and yes, I'd like to make some money."

Brian Hanks:

This is the moment. If you screw it up, if you buy the wrong practice, all of that work is at risk. All of the late nights studying for the biology undergrad, and the DAT, and the boards and all of that. So, if you buy the wrong practice, man, is it going to be a painful experience to try to get out from underneath. It's not impossible. You can reverse the decision of a bad purchase, but it is very difficult to do, and it takes years and it can cost a lot of money.

Brian Hanks:

So, the risk is you fall down 10 feet shy at the end of the marathon, and all you needed to do is just get across that finish line and ride off into the sunset of a great career.

Corey Brown:

So, getting it right the first time using a buyer representative, sounds like the way to go.

Brian Hanks:

I'm biased. But yes, I like to think that's a good idea. Yes.

Corey Brown:

So, obviously you would be a good example, but what do I look for in a good buyer representative? Because, I'm sure there're many options out there these days. Are there any red flags that we should look out for?

Brian Hanks:

That's a good question. There are a few. I would like to see more in the industry. I always joke with folks that provide, and in and around the industry, someone will tell me about a competitor. "Brian, have you heard about this competitor?" I'm like, "Great, fantastic." So much of a, let's have 20 dental buyer advocate companies out there, because it's going to normalize the process of getting a buyer advocate. But, so far there are a few. I would say red flags would be, ask about the number of transitions a year that they do.

Brian Hanks:

This isn't necessarily an automatic waving red flag, this is a yellow flag flapping in the breeze, is your traditional dental CPA, who understands numbers, who understands taxes and sees 2, 3, 4 transitions a year. That person has a pretty good understanding of the transition process, but not a deep understanding. They don't have the deep relationships. They don't have the deep knowledge of valuations and some of the subtleties there. So, number of transitions per year.

Brian Hanks:

Whether or not they focus solely on dental would be a question I would ask. A lot of people dabble in chiropractic and veterinarians, some into these other areas, in an attempt to feel less risk. They can get, potentially, more clients from other places. I would get someone that focuses on dentistry solely.

Brian Hanks:

Then, someone who has accounting background, right. Do they understand the numbers side, which is where a lot of dentists don't have the experience, and where you're going to need that help to, like I said, uncover the dead bodies that are buried in the financial statements.

Corey Brown:

Yeah. That's great advice. After discussing the importance of working with a buyer representative, I'm excited to learn what it's like to actually work with one. So, let's see what Brian has to say after we take this short break.

Corey Brown:

I'm Corey Brown, and this is, Provide's the Path to Owning It Podcast. We're back with Brian Hanks, owner of, Dentalbuyeradvocates.com. Brian, I want to talk a little bit more about the process of working with a buyer representative. What would you say are some of the questions an aspiring owner should ask a buyer rep upon that first meeting?

Brian Hanks:

How much it costs, of course, is the first question. By the way, I'll give you my biased answer, of course, is the buyer representation process is so fluid, and it can be a slightly different path for every buyer. I like to see a buyer representative who will commit to a flat fee, right? So, there's no worry or wondering from the buyer's side, "How much am I going to owe these people?" Right? There are a lot of lawyers out there. The traditional legal model is to charge hourly. There are some buyer's representatives and brokers who will charge an hourly model, and I get it.

Brian Hanks:

From my perspective, there have been a few clients I've worked with where I have put in 2, 3, 400 hours worth of work for a set flat rate, and if I do the math, I'm making far less than minimum wage on a few deals. But, for the most part, those even out, I'm able to commit to a specific fee because I know, I have the confidence, in how much time, effort and energy a specific deal is going to cost. So it's, semi tongue in cheek, Corey, for me to say, "Hey, well how much do they cost?" but there is some wisdom behind there, because you want to know how they charge the money, too. Do you know what your bill is going to be at the end of the day, and when they charge it? We do a retainer up front, and then we charge the bulk of our fee on the back end, because that's when, Provide, gave them a bunch of money, and they need that cash early on in the process, and they don't need to be handing it to guys like me.

Brian Hanks:

So, "How much do you charge? When do you charge it? Is it a flat rate? Hourly?" I think those would be some of the first questions I'd ask.

Brian Hanks:

Second, I would think about the process. "What exactly are you going to help me with?" I've seen varying degrees of service in a buyer advocate space, where, are you helping me find a practice? Are you helping me analyze the practice? I've seen a few buyer advocate services where they say, "Now, go sign a letter of intent first, then hire us, and we'll help you." Right or wrong, you need to know when that person is going to jump in, and exactly what they're going to help you with. My opinion would be, if I'm signing a letter of intent and then I'm going to get help, 75% of the value of that buyer advocate is already passed. You need to understand, before a letter of intent is signed, what you're getting into and whether or not it's a good decision.

Brian Hanks:

"How many transitions do you do a year?" would be a question I would ask. "Talk to me about past clients. What have they said? Do you have any feedback? Can you give me some referrals?" Then, of course, I would ask other people in the dental transitions industry about whoever it is you're talking to. So, this happens to me all the time, Corey. Buyers will email me. People I've never heard from, they've listened to my podcast, or have read my book or whatever, and they'll say, "Hey, Brian, read your book. You've talked about bankers in the book. Talking to Corey at, Provide, what do you think of, Provide?" Right? So, buyers do it to me. And I'm sure that they're calling Corey at, Provide, and they're saying, "Hey, I've heard about this Brian Hanks guy, is he any good?"

Brian Hanks:

You'll start to triangulate around who's good in the industry, who has good reputation, who gets deals to the finish line, who tends to kill deals, who's difficult to work with, who has burned a lot of relationships. Those would be, in addition to asking the buyer themselves, I would also ask other people. You can do the searches on, Dentaltown, and the Facebook groups and all that, and that's not, maybe, unhelpful, but I've looked around at people that give advice on banks, for example, on some of these Facebook groups with 10,000, 15,000 dentists, and the advice is mixed, right? I know exactly who the good banks are, bankers' rates, all of these things, and it's just hilarious. That online forum, I'm anonymous, I can say whatever I want online. So, I'd be a little more careful there, even though it's worth a search or two.

Corey Brown:

Sure. That's great advice. On that flip side, what should a provider be prepared with to bring to their first meeting with you? What point in the process do you like them to come to you? I see on your website, you've got a three-phase plan and there's a little pre-work and post work. Can you explain that a little bit?

Brian Hanks:

Yeah. So, the right time to talk to a buyer advocate, in my opinion, and hire them, is when you have a practice in mind, and someone has given you some documents of some kind. By documents, I mean anything with numbers on the page. Production reports, financial statements, tax returns. Brokers sometimes will have a package they'll email with PDFs and fun graphs and charts and things.

Brian Hanks:

So, Corey, you might ask a reasonable question, "Well, wait a minute, couldn't a buyer's advocate help the dentist find the practice?" That's what brokers do. Brokers are matching buyers and sellers, why isn't the buyer's advocate doing the same thing? The quick answer to that is, for me, at least, since we work nationwide and we don't focus on a specific geography, tough for us to know all of the practices that are for sale in all of the regions, number one.

Brian Hanks:

But then, number two, and this is, again, an admittedly terrible analogy. The analogy I like to give buyers is, it's a little bit like looking for a spouse, right? I can give you all the principles, all the advice. I can tell you where to look. I can tell you, to take my analogy a little too far, how to dress, what to say on the first date, all of these things. I can teach you the principles, but you are the one that actually has to go to the bar, jump on Tinder, go on the first dates, suffer through a few bad first dates until you find the one that you think you may want to marry. That's the point where you need to start reaching out and hiring someone.

Brian Hanks:

So, I do give a lot of advice. I spend a lot of time with prospective buyers on the process of reaching out to brokers, sending mailers. "How do I find practices? What do I say to sellers? When's the right time to ask for tax returns?" I do answer all of that. I have resources for all of that, but I've got all that for free, because I just want to give people that information. The time to actually hire someone is when you actually have a practice in mind, and that's the moment where a lot of dentists start to feel a little out of their element. They're looking at a tax return and it's Greek, and they're going, "What in the world am I looking at?" And by the way, that makes you a terribly normal human being, to not be able to look at a tax return and make sense of it. It's us abnormal people that make sense of tax returns.

Corey Brown:

That's why we have accountants like you to help us out like that, right.

Brian Hanks:

That's right. Exactly.

Corey Brown:

So, Brian, tell me about a time, I'm sure this has happened to you, where you've had a dentist come to you. They have this practice in mind. They're super excited about it, right? They're like, "This is it. This is the one." You take one look and think, "This is a disaster. How am I going to tell them this?" What does that conversation go like?

Brian Hanks:

My personality is... Unfortunately, Corey, the last part of that question never quite enters my mind. The, "How am I going to tell them this?" It's a character defect of mine that I just tell them, but no, it happens all the time. Let me give you the most common scenario. I was working with a doctor. This was last month, but, Corey, this happens at least once a month. I will get a call from a buyer, and it's a variation on the same story every time.

Brian Hanks:

They've worked for, usually five years, after a residency, or a dental school or something like that. They've been an employee dentist for five years, and they're sick of it. They cannot wait to have that control that every dentist wants in their career, and part of their frustration is they know they should have been looking 2, 3, 4 years ago, but they never felt ready. The student loans balance felt too high, all of these things. So, they've waited waited, waited, waited, waited, and now they've reached the peak frustration in their career. Boss came in, gave them some unreasonable demand. They did the crown prep right, they know they did, and somebody's hammering them for it, right? So they're like, "Ugh," and they hop on a website, they find a practice. They send it to me, and they're excited.

Brian Hanks:

This dentist, a month ago, they did. They were so excited. "Brian, you won't believe it. I went online. I'm in Santa Fe, New Mexico." This wasn't where they were, "And guess what? There's the practice for sale Santa Fe, New Mexico. I didn't think there would be, but here it is. I'm ready to hire you. Can you please help me out?" First, I said, "I'm so honored. Thank you. First of all, thank you. Second, keep your money, because this is-"

Corey Brown:

Not the one.

Brian Hanks:

"This is not the one." We had to have a conversation about, what does it mean to have the one? Now, the reason that most people get excited isn't the practice. It's the frustration in their job, right? They're done. They want to get paid. They want control. They want to fire the hygienist they can't stand working with anymore, whatever it is, right? So, they'll send me, usually it's a practice that's collecting $450,000 or less, and this dentist is convinced that within 18 months they can take it to a million dollars. I'm the one that has to pour the cold bucket of water on their head and say, "All right, hold on. For the last 10 years, this practice has only collected between 350 and 450, and the seller, by the way, is 60 years old, and they're not a bad dentist. They are not dumb, and you are not super smart compared to them. What makes you think that you can do it?"

Brian Hanks:

Now, sometimes, Corey, I will admit, sometimes they have an answer, and it's a good answer. I say, "Ooh, you have a good answer that I didn't anticipate you having. Let's talk. Let's figure out a business plan that can take that 450 practice and take it up to a reasonable number." By the way, Corey, it's not all about collections. There are a lot of other reasons that buyers come to me with a bad practice, and it's not a good fit. Sometimes it's a production mix thing. 15% of the production is in implants, the buyer doesn't even do implants. Buyer doesn't want to do, Invisalign, the seller does a lot of it. Things like that, right?

Brian Hanks:

But, usually it's, the buyer is sick of their job. Found a super small practice that some broker somewhere couldn't sell for their life. A buyer expressed some interest and the broker was like, "Oh my gosh, finally, it's been six months. No-one's even looked at this practice," and this buyer is saying, "Hey, I might be interested," and they get excited, and I'm the one that has to say, "Hey, guess what? Practice that collects 450 with a reasonable overhead, 60% or so, means that only $180,000 of profit comes to you. By the way, that's before you pay the, Provide loan. That's before you pay your taxes. That's before you pay your student loans." Then I have to go be the one to say, "How do you feel about making the equivalent of $75,000 a year?"

Brian Hanks:

So, it's a tough conversation, but I like to have that conversation as early as possible, because I never want to be the guy that says, "Yeah, sure. Pay me some money," and then I dump the cold water. I like to dump the cold water, if I need to, as soon as possible. I try to do it politely, but I'm never shy about dumping the water.

Corey Brown:

What are some of those good answers? Is that like them introducing new technology the old doctor didn't have? Tell me about what that might be.

Brian Hanks:

Yeah, it's rarely new technology Corey. I don't know. We sometimes get in enamored with the latest and greatest technology, but that's rarely it, right. Usually, it's a connection the buyer has to the town. So, personal connections, they grew up there, they know X, Y, Z referral source. Sometimes, it's that the seller was terrible. They were a terrible dentist, they had lawsuits flying everywhere, their website's nonexistent, and the buyer just knows that if they can come in, it's in a good location with good demographics, and if they just act like a normal business person. But, yeah, usually it's something personal related to the buyer and the town. That's usually the answer that will demonstrate business knowledge beyond what a seller was demonstrating. That's the key that I'm looking for. If the buyer's assumption is, "Seller dumb, me smart," I can almost guarantee that it's not going to work.

Brian Hanks:

Now, that's not necessarily false either, right? It absolutely could be accurate that the seller wasn't as good a business person as this buyer, but, triple, quadruple? Is the buyer going to suddenly show up and the schedule's suddenly going to be full? You're taking an awful risk, right? So, I know work sucks, right? It's the dentist whose job is annoying and they're ready to be done, but which is riskier? Hanging onto that job for 2, 3, 4 more months, while they find a better practice, or pulling the trigger on this start fixer upper practice that may or may not work, and they're going to be stuck in there for 10 years before they figure out that, "Gosh, maybe the seller wasn't so dumb after all?"

Corey Brown:

Yeah. That's great advice. On the flip side, let's talk about, when is your job done? Should a provider keep in touch with you post-sale? What are the advantages and disadvantages of that?

Brian Hanks:

Our job is done the day of closing. When the buyer has keys in hand for the front door of their practice, we part ways, shake hands. We stay friends. We stay in touch, but we don't have any products or services we sell after the fact. Now, that could be a question that you ask. Back to your early question, "What's a question you ask a buyer advocate?" I think that's a good question. "What are you going to try to sell me after I buy this practice?" The possible answers could include, "Nothing." That's what we do. We want to just get really good at transitions, but some people will do tax returns and bookkeeping after the fact. Some people will sell consulting. "We want to be your in-house consultant for 40, $50,000 a year, and us helping you with the transition is just a way to build a relationship, so that you hire us as a consultant for $40,000 a year for the next five years."

Brian Hanks:

For us, we let the best CPAs, consultants, we let them take over. After the transition closes. Of course, we stay in touch, and ask how things are going, and see what help we can provide, but we don't sell anything after the fact.

Corey Brown:

So, we've talked about a lot of advantages for having a buyer rep today. If you could boil that all down to just one piece of advice, what's the best piece of advice you could give an aspiring practice owner?

Brian Hanks:

The people you pay directly are the ones that actually have your best interests at heart. So, if you are not paying the person directly, wonder whether or not that person is giving you advice that's helpful for you, or it's helpful for them.

Brian Hanks:

The classic story, I had my first buyer push back on a very big, common brokerage name that we all know in the transitions industry, and the buyer was slid a piece of paper across the table that said, "Dual representation," right at the top. The buyer said, "Dual representation. Talk to me about that. What does that mean?" And the broker said, "Well, I'm going to represent you, and I'm going to represent the seller. I'm going to help you guys make the best deal." The buyer, correctly, said, "Well, wait a minute. How can you look after both of our interests over things that are a zero sum negotiation? Things like the price, asset allocation, account receivable, timing, all of these things?" This was the first buyer, by the way, who said, "I'm not going to sign this, but I still want to buy the practice if you'll give me a way out of this dual representation that I'm happy to sign and move on."

Brian Hanks:

So, I would say, best advice is, work with the people that you pay directly. The people you pay are the people that are giving you advice that should be in your best interest. In the financial world, they call it a fiduciary responsibility. I say, the accountant you pay, or your buyer's representative, you pay directly. They're looking after your best interests. They're a fiduciary for you. Your lawyer, right? Legally, and actually by bar code ethics, and all kinds of different rules, your lawyer is looking after your best interests, partially because you're paying them directly.

Brian Hanks:

Then, the other person that I put on that list, and it's a short list, I'd say those two, plus your bank. You're paying directly, right? Now, the bank is going to get paid back by you, right? So the bank has a very strong, vested interest in making sure you get into the right practice and you're able to pay them back. So, don't be shy about making sure the practice is the right one for you. Don't buy too big." But I would say by far, the bigger risk is people buy too small of a practice, not too big of a practice, so that's just a small asterisk, but yeah. Accountant, lawyer, bank, those are the people you pay directly.

Brian Hanks:

Broker, you're not paying, the broker is not on your team, but they can be an important part. Seller, obviously, is not paying you. You're paying the seller. There are other people involved that you pay indirectly, insurance reps, and credentialing specialists, and other folks that either might or might not be on the team, but the people you pay directly are those that are looking after your best interests, and this is the time to be really selfish and really careful about who has your best interests at heart.

Corey Brown:

That's great advice, Brian. If our listeners want you on their team, and want to pay you directly, remind them how they do that and how they follow your podcast.

Brian Hanks:

The first thing to view would probably be just go subscribe to the podcast. It's free. It's called, Practice Purchased. Practice Purchased Podcast. You just pop that in Google, or Spotify, or any podcast, or you'll find it. We do it by seasons, so we don't have weekly guests. I just say, "Hey, right, this is an event in a dentist's life," right? They're going to want to binge it like they would a Netflix season of, Stranger Things, or something, right? So, the, Practice Purchased Podcast, would probably be a good place to go. You can also get a book online, that's on Amazon, called, very creatively, titled, How to Buy a Dental Practice. I'm an accountant. I'm not claiming any creativity skills here, but those resources will get you a lot of the way through.

Brian Hanks:

Then, that's very kind of you to ask the question that way, Corey. If they want to work with me directly, dentalbuyeradvocates.com. You can see pricing services, everything, there. I try to provide as much free information out there as possible, just in case there are people out there that, they can't afford the fee, or they don't want to afford the fee and they think that they can do it themselves. I want people to be equipped with good knowledge, and so call your, Provide, rep, find out who they are. They're great. They're going to help, and if you want to work with us directly, I'd be honored, and you can reach out, just right on the website.

Corey Brown:

Well, Brian, you certainly are wealth of knowledge on the subject of buyer representation. I hope our listeners were taking lots of notes today during this discussion. Again, just thank you so much for taking the time with us today, Brian, and helping our listeners realize the importance of buyer representation.

Brian Hanks:

Corey, it's been an honor. Thank you again.

Corey Brown:

Thank you for joining us for this episode of, The Path to Owning It. If you're ready to take your practice ownership dreams into your own hands, be sure to visit Getprovide.com, to pre-qualify and browse our practice marketplace, or check our news page for more helpful resources. The Path to Owning It, is brought to you by the team at, Provide, with production assistance from Sarah [Parky 00:27:39], [Tiara 00:27:39] Thomas, Jessica [Arm-Brewster 00:27:41] and Liv [inaudible 00:27:42]. It's produced by, Podcamp Media, branded podcast production for businesses. Podcampmedia.com, producer Dusty Weis, editor, Larry Kilgore III. For, Provide, I'm Corey Brown. Thanks for being on the journey with us.


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